the ceo magazine, corporate mission,

Rosabeth Moss Kanter, a Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School believes that the traditional objective of business, which is profit-making, doesn’t reflect the way how great companies work toward success. Through her research on the most successful companies situated across more than 20 countries on 4 continents, she proves that an institutional logic lies behind the successful practices of great companies. 

the ceo magazine, viral marketing,

“Gone viral” is a phrase that marketers are desperately chasing these days. They all want their products to “go viral” and many businesses that have sprung up that provide services to make your product, idea or cause go viral. Now they may be effective or just making money off a latest fad, because “virality” seems to be a unpredictable and spontaneous. Yes, an interesting concept, a superior product, a heart tugging cause, clever advertising can increase the chances of virality, but there are so many ideas that have these characteristics but have failed to gather any significant attention. 

the ceo magazine, corporate culture,
Jack Litewka, Author, THE SOPHISTICATED MANAGER:  Essential Leadership Lessons for Developing High-Performance Team… and Avoiding Critical Mistakes

A CEO creates the Corporate Culture.  This activity deserves and requires careful thought and communication. If this activity is considered a “nice-to-have”, then the resulting culture is random and becomes “cultural transmission by osmosis” – which is not the most effective way to form a great culture that is tightly aligned to a company’s vision, mission, goals, and values.

Creating a Great Corporate Culture requires that dozens of puzzle pieces fit together. Following are three key pieces to the puzzle that need a CEO’s focused and ongoing attention… because the CEO really is the Cultural Excellence Officer.

the ceo magazine, productivity,
Lisa Bodell, Founder & CEO, futurethink

In 1944, the Office of Strategic Services—forerunner to the C.I.A.— wrote a field manual for agents looking to sabotage organizations in the name of American national security. The manual included a striking strategy: complication. The agency directed saboteurs to “insist on doing everything through channels. Never permit shortcuts to be taken in order to expedite decisions. Multiply the procedures and clearances…see that three people have to approve everything where one would do.”

the ceo magazine, manage stress,
Genella Macintyre, President of Partners, Discovery Ltd.

As a leader, you set the tone for the team, department and organization. Under stress you may appear and act differently than you intend. This impacts you and your team significantly. The “5 Steps to Reducing Stress” can help.

I received a call from a very stressed-out young lady. She had just started a new job and was feeling more than a little overwhelmed. She asked me if I would help. She was a new supervisor, eager to succeed, and she knew that as a new leader, she might fall victim to the common mistakes new leaders make. She did not. What she did face, however, was stress – stress in the staff, stress in her own supervisor and of course, stress in herself.

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