the ceo magazine, customer experience,
Chip R. Bell, Author, Kaleidoscope:  Delivering Innovative Service That Sparkles

Growing up on a cattle farm is a chance to see both the promise and perils of freedom.  For months cows leisurely graze, sleep in the shade, and drink water from a nearby pond.  In the winter when there is no grass, bales of hay are delivered to their “doorstep.”  But, when the time comes for cows to be transported to market, herding can become a bit of a challenge.  It starts out rather peaceful; but, as cows are moved from the open pasture into small holding pens and then forced to go up a loading shoot and onto the truck, it requires electric prods to convert their revolt into compliance.

the ceo magazine, pivoting,
John F. Dowling

In 1985, Dick Yuengling took over the family beer business due to the failing health of his father. During that time, three major brewers controlled 70% of the US Domestic beer market. Yuengling’s share was 0.065%. Some independent brewers gave up and sold off to larger competitors. Other smaller brewers followed the M&A strategy to get bigger and chase the big 3 (Anheuser- Busch, Miller & Stroh’s).

Leadership traps that will derail your change efforts

This article is the second in the “All Change is Personal” series looking at three traps that leaders need to manage in order to steward their organization through change efforts.  To read the first article in the series and learn what Trap #1 is, click here.

Trap #2:  Not Getting Employee Feedback on the Plan

As the Owner and CEO of a small business, I have learned valuable lessons about running an effective organization. You learn quickly that you need to be able to budget and make decisions that benefit both your company and your employees. However, one of the most concerning issues facing American small businesses is the current tax situation. Simplicity is key for the growth of a company, especially in its early years, and taxes can be an absolute headache when it comes time to prepare and file.

the ceo magazine, corporate values,
Julie C. Lellis and Melissa Eggleston

Zombies have no motive other than sustaining themselves. On reckless missions to find food at all costs, they alienate and repel others. Businesses can act like zombies, and they are often easy to spot! They may make decisions that don’t prioritize others and pay the price. They can’t move quickly or adjust to change. And we really don’t know what they will do or say next.

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