the ceo magazine, culture,
Kathy Bloomgarden, CEO, Ruder Finn

As companies seek a new strategic vision in a digital age, mergers are on the rise. Many of the mergers on the table are driven by the urgency to transform business strategy and gain scale. This is leading to the combination of companies with widely varying cultures. In this context, it’s no longer enough for company leaders to focus solely on the combination of finances and operations; they need to know how to best combine two (often very different) cultures, all while maintaining a strong company internal spirit in the wake of major changes. In fact, cultural integration was the second most common direct factor cited for deal failure by companies in Aon Hewitt’s Global Survey and has increasingly become recognized as a top issue in deal-making.

the ceo magazine, leadership,
Chip R. Bell, Author, Kaleidoscope:  Delivering Innovative Service That Sparkles

There was a Muppet character on Sesame Street who was an enthusiastic chef with such a strong Swedish accent you could not understand a single word he said.  His sketch appeared like a Julia Childs style cooking show.  My son was eight or nine at the time, and it made him laugh every time.  My late business partner was of Swedish heritage and from Minnesota.  He loved telling jokes about Minnesotans with Swedish accents.  While you could understand all his words, his accent sounded much like the Muppet character. 

Nobody I know proudly brags about being a micromanager. Frankly, most vehemently deny the label. Yet the workplace overflows with them. Here’s how to spot them on your team before you give them even bigger opportunities to frustrate the people who work with them. And if deep down you fear you may be falling into the micromanagement trap yourself, consider these signs before it’s too late to make a change.

Micromanagers Complain About Work Overload

the ceo magazine, decision making,
Linda Henman, President, Henman Performance Group

Why do some people trust their instincts, push forward and win, while others stumble to erroneous conclusions and then steadfastly defend their bad decisions? Why do some people rush to make bad decisions while others take their time and then make bad decisions? Whether thinking quickly or slowly, we rely on our emotions, mindset, and cognitive abilities to help us make decisions. Then, we open our mouths to let others know what that decision is. Most people would benefit from adding another step to the sequence—one that checks that we are advocating the right decision, not just the one we feel passionate about.

the ceo magazine, change management,
Mostafa Sayyadi, Author, Leading Between the Lines

Today‘s globalized nature of business is placing more pressure on companies to employ change management leaders who are capable to build learning companies. There are many studies that focus on the organizational factors that drive organizational innovation. Structure is one such area that plays a critical role and is a strategic prerequisite for business success in today’s knowledge-based economy.

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