ceo magazine, succession planning
Paul Nourigat

An unprecedented wave of staff turnover will rock most industries for the next 15 years. The retirement of CEOs, their direct reports and many highly skilled positions will create an unprecedented vacuum of human capital. As the economy improves and productivity improvement tapers off, robotics and sourcing strategies will hit their ceiling and human reinvestment will be required to fill the gaps. Regardless the size or ownership structure of American companies, most simply aren't ready.

ceo magazine, leadership

We’d like to think that if we met someone who didn’t have a conscience, we would size up the situation quickly and accurately. If we were to encounter the corporate equivalent to the fictitious Hannibal Lecter, the evil psychiatrist Anthony Hopkins made famous in Silence of the Lambs, we believe that, like FBI agent Clarice Starling, we would not only assess him accurately, we would know what to do to overpower him. And we’d be wrong.

ceo magazine, leadership
Dr. Albert de Goias

Leadership in business is not just the art of directing the motivated or motivating the confused or irresolute person.  It is about guiding the emotionally unstable to believe in themselves and tap into their unique insights.  A person’s real contribution is not driven by their ability to apply directives, but by offering valuable insights and a positive attitude.

Justin Snell, Director, Dispute Resolution & Forensics, Bennett Thrasher 

Bad Things Happen

As the CEO it’s easy to think that everyone knows, understands and believes in the vision you have for the organization. You like to think that everyone is working to accomplish the organization’s goals. After all, you spent countless sacrificial hours developing a vision and strategy for your organization. You’ve read and studied leadership techniques and how to get the most out of your people, and how to motivate, incentivize and reward them. And so it’s all the more perplexing when you learn that someone in your organization has committed fraud.

ceo magazine mental health
Barbara Jaurequi, MS, LMFT, MAC

Why certain employees are “really difficult” to deal with isn’t always clear. Some are simply annoying or interpersonally inept. However, some difficult employees may be legitimately mentally ill and in need of professional intervention.

Consider that, according to the National Association of Mental Health, incidences of mental illness in the workplace are not uncommon. The NAMH reports that an estimated 26.2 percent of Americans ages 18 and older — about one in four adults — suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder in a given year. Many of these disorders can cause the sufferers to demonstrate symptoms remarkably similar to the personal traits of someone who is simply obnoxious.

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