brainstorming - the CEO magazine
Keith Harmeyer and Mitchell Rigie

Not so long ago, a business could thrive for decades on just one great idea. But in today's innovation-driven marketplace, in order to remain relevant and successful you need a big idea every year, every quarter, or in some industries, every few days.

While many new innovation methodologies have been developed, group brainstorming, in one form or another, is still the most widely utilized process for generating and developing ideas. But while brainstorming can be a productive way to solve problems and capitalize on opportunities, far too often the process gets hijacked by disruptive individuals who undermine their team's efforts.

hiring top talent - The CEO Magazine
Michael Simpson, CEO of Pairin

At 25 years old, six months into my first time of leading a company, my mentor asked me why I was so stressed. I said, “We are doing a good job of understanding our customers and competition, and we’re providing good service. If I didn’t have staff problems, I would have very few problems at all.” More than two decades later, after 10 years of coaching executives in four countries, and now as the CEO of a software company that engages with executives around the world, it seems to me that 25-year-old leaders aren’t the only ones that share this sentiment.

business growth - The CEO Magazine
Wain Kellum, CEO, Vocalocity

I have been fortunate enough to have been the CEO of six fast-growth companies, and I have worked with or served thousands of other businesses. I have learned that every business has many things that make it unique, but the one thing all businesses have in common is that they could benefit from more revenue. You want to grow; you want to expand; you want to succeed! But, as you grow, you don’t want to disrupt the formula that has driven your company thus far. So, what’s the best way to continue growing a company that is already successful?

Risk Taking Leadership The CEO Magazine
Emma Sinclair

What are the skills, tendencies and inclinations that separate a good business person from a true leader? My short answer? An appetite for risk.

I IPO-d my company at 29, the youngest person in the United Kingdom to have done so. I often wonder what it is about me that gave me the confidence to contemplate doing that; the innocence of youth not explanation enough for the path I decided to tread.

In the past three weeks, I have facilitated several meetings within organizations both large and small in which I helped teams create plans to meet their goals. One common and recurring theme I hear is the “problem with management” or “the leaders don’t understand what we’re dealing with”. When these comments are made, the leaders aren’t in the room. And in my own experience, even if they were, they might not be responsive to this criticism about their lack of commitment and understanding.

Pages

Contact

Follow The Blog

   Email * 
Subscribe to Syndicate

Blog Categories

Blog Authors

kajabi
eclub

EC

ad5
ad6

ad7

ad8