~~Getting Great People and Keeping Them are Two Very Different Things

Part of the formula for a vibrant and sustainable culture is hiring inspired and talented people. But, it’s not enough for you to bring people on board who share your values and your purpose. You need to keep these people on board. In most cases, if you’re charismatic, passionate and compelling enough, you’ll usually be able to sell something to someone, whether it’s a product, service or a position within your company. The real challenge however is holding onto the client, or the talented employee. So what’s the formula?

Across the corporate world these days, many companies have the walls of their respective locations plastered with various positive statements regarding how upstanding their values are, that their employees matter, etc.  In particular, many companies now claim to have an “Open Door” policy when it comes to issue resolution and/or the presentation of ideas.  However, in many cases this policy truly exists on a superficial level only, with the sad truth being that these so-called “empowering” programs are merely an exercise of smoke & mirrors to make operations appear better to the outside

the ceo magazine, tax saving tips,
Gary C. Smith, President & CEO, NAEIR

If yours is like many companies, you’ve got pallets of excess inventory taking up valuable warehouse space and putting a drag on your bottom line.  

The good news is, there’s a smart, easy way to turn that slow moving inventory into a hefty asset. One that doesn’t involve profit-devouring discounts or liquidation hassles. It’s called product philanthropy. And for C Corporations, it’s one of the best kept secrets of the IRS tax code.   

I recently gave a talk on the chemistry of strategy to the CEO Club of Boston. The talk was scheduled to start at 10 a.m. and to finish no later than 11 a.m. I’ve devoted the last forty years to this topic, so I could have talked for hours. But I didn’t. Why? Because I knew the people in the audience had planned their day around the meeting finishing on time. Many attendees had made commitments for later in the day -- follow-up telephone calls, other meetings, and delivery of projects they had committed to finish that day.

Here I am the owner of a company that provides Travel and Meeting Management services and I have not taken my Executive Team offsite for our annual planning session in far too many years. That changed this past week when my team and I traveled to the El Conquistador Resort in Puerto Rico for our planning session (it is a great place by the way). I didn’t care that it sounded like a vacation and nor should you - ever. We got such better results from these days together than at the past local meetings we have ever had. Here were the five biggest differences from a local meeting:

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