the ceo magazine, mission statement,
Gary Morton, Author, Commanding Excellence: Inspiring Purpose, Passion, and Ingenuity through Leadership That Matters

Inspiring human beings to achieve the truly extraordinary requires something more than a mission statement. Well-constructed mission statements define the field of play, what the organization does on those fields, and what is unique about the organization’s approach; but they are typically too complex and lengthy to become a rally cry. Two organizations that accomplished what experts in their fields thought impossible exhibited a rally-cry-like internal ethos centered on an absolutely clear organizational purpose.  Task Force 4-68 (TF 4-68) that won an unprecedented nine of nine force-on-force engagements at the US Army’s grueling National Training Center (NTC) and device maker Stryker that grew earnings at a consistent pace of 20 percent or more for 28 consecutive years had simple, three-word goals that expressed their ultimate expectations. These goals communicated a defining commitment that went beyond a mission statement or even a mission statement on steroids. 

As CEO, you’re frequently called on to introduce someone—a celebrity for your big client event of the year, an industry guru for your management meeting, a politician for a community gathering.  Whatever the occasion, you never want to be that person who disappoints the speaker, confuses the crowd, and embarrasses yourself.

Karim Bishay, Living Orgs
In our current landscape of business, companies are constantly trying to adapt strategies and techniques in order to address the rapid change and new information that is all around us. However, very few companies have looked at how they distribute power throughout their organizations.
 
Power, if it is always held by the CEO, can slow a company down, create a workforce that doesn’t buy in, and result in high turnover.
the ceo magazine, corporate mission,
Peter Georgescu, Chairman Emeritus, Young & Rubicam

Jim Sinegal is the son of a coal miner and steelworker. He grew up with a firsthand view of the realities of human labor and the difficulties of making a living through decades of sustained hard work, in his father’s life and then in his own. What has endeared him to me the most may be that he’s also a CEO who, at one point, has told unhappy shareholder activists to take a flying leap. He’s the founder of Costco, one of the most successful retailers in the world, in an industry that’s as tough as it gets. Few companies anywhere operate in an industry with lower margins. Costco is a public company, so it has no choice but to deliver top performance for shareholders. And yet, Sinegal founded the company with four simple, key principles:

the ceo magazine, organizational culture,
Gregg Thompson, Author, THE MASTER COACH:  Leading with Character, Building Connections, and Engaging in Extraordinary Conversations

When I was growing up, coaches were the guys with the loud voices and even louder whistles out on the sports field. But these days, coaching is everywhere. From the basketball court to the boardroom, coaching is recognized as a critical element in the pursuit of high performance and accelerated learning. We have life coaches, parenting coaches, relationship coaches, wealth coaches, health coaches—the list goes on. And within the business world, coaching has soared in popularity, becoming the fastest growing human resource development process today. Why? Because it works!  

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