the ceo magazine, corporate mission,
Peter Georgescu, Chairman Emeritus, Young & Rubicam

Jim Sinegal is the son of a coal miner and steelworker. He grew up with a firsthand view of the realities of human labor and the difficulties of making a living through decades of sustained hard work, in his father’s life and then in his own. What has endeared him to me the most may be that he’s also a CEO who, at one point, has told unhappy shareholder activists to take a flying leap. He’s the founder of Costco, one of the most successful retailers in the world, in an industry that’s as tough as it gets. Few companies anywhere operate in an industry with lower margins. Costco is a public company, so it has no choice but to deliver top performance for shareholders. And yet, Sinegal founded the company with four simple, key principles:

the ceo magazine, organizational culture,
Gregg Thompson, Author, THE MASTER COACH:  Leading with Character, Building Connections, and Engaging in Extraordinary Conversations

When I was growing up, coaches were the guys with the loud voices and even louder whistles out on the sports field. But these days, coaching is everywhere. From the basketball court to the boardroom, coaching is recognized as a critical element in the pursuit of high performance and accelerated learning. We have life coaches, parenting coaches, relationship coaches, wealth coaches, health coaches—the list goes on. And within the business world, coaching has soared in popularity, becoming the fastest growing human resource development process today. Why? Because it works!  

the ceo magazine, decision making,

Early in 1998, my doctoral committee met to approve my dissertation proposal. Or, at least I thought that was the goal of the meeting. As it turns out, they met to discuss all the reasons for their disapproval: My research thesis was inconsistent; I had proposed a flawed research methodology; and I had formulated inane interview questions. After the meeting, I sat crestfallen and dejected in the lounge staring into space. A fellow doctoral candidate joined me and asked about my pained look. I explained the number of things my committee had agreed were wrong with my dissertation. She broke into a smile and said, “Linda, at least you got them to agree on a bunch of stuff!”

Leaders Must Have the “Edge” to Drive Change

Leaders Must Have the “Edge” to Drive Change

This article is the third in the “All Change is Personal” series looking at three traps that leaders need to manage in order to steward their organization through change efforts.  To read the first two articles in the series and learn what Trap’s #1 and #2 are, click here:

Trap #3:  Lacking Sufficient Edge to Get the Job Done

Pop quiz here:

  • Do you sometimes second-guess yourself about decisions until opportunities pass?
  • Do colleagues and clients frequently seek your opinion on their big decisions?
  • Do you often get feedback on the quality of your contributions in meetings?
  • Do those meeting ideas produce the results you intend?

Like artists, wise leaders analyze and focus on a situation or problem. Then they decide and act. And even then, as theologian and author Oswald Chambers put it: “It’s never wise to be cocksure.”

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