the ceo magazine, employee retention,
Nancy O’Keefe, Author, Fighting The Talent Battle: How To Update Your Arsenal and Win the War

Finding great employees is a top problem organizations struggle with today. It is getting more and more difficult to attract, motivate and retain employees with the skills that are needed in a fast-changing business and technological world. Business leaders should be looking for the problem solvers, the innovative thinkers, the adaptable leaders and those with strong emotional intelligence to build the skills into organizations that are needed today and will be needed tomorrow. These skills and characteristics are becoming harder and more expensive to find. It currently costs about 2x salary to acquire a new hire and that price tag is going up as the supply of those skills become scarce. 

Having Difficult Conversations Isn't Easy

One of the most important things a CEO must do is have skillful difficult conversations – holding people accountable, rolling out change people don’t like, pushing back with the board, and for those of you with teenagers, telling them “no” to something they really, REALLY, want.    I’ve trained and coached many CEO’s, and these are 4 common mistakes that they (and I) make that will trigger other people defensive emotions when having a difficult conversation:

the ceo magazine, team management,
Susan Solovic, Author, The One Percent Edge: Small Changes That Guarantee Relevance and Build Sustainable Success

“Surround yourself with the best people you can find, delegate authority, and don't interfere as long as the policy you've decided upon is being carried out.”

—Ronald Reagan

Many people believe Ronald Reagan was a great president. Whether you agree isn’t important for me to make my point. People thought Reagan would fail, but Reagan surrounded himself with some of the best and the brightest minds America had to offer. As a result, he transformed a struggling economy into one with soaring growth, he rebuilt the military, and he restored alliances. He did what many of his critics thought was impossible.

Clark, my client, stopped by our office unexpected:  “I have good news and bad news. The good news first. . . . A couple of partners and I just bought a small telecom—a spinoff of the division I managed before we all got laid off.”

“Sounds like great news,”  I said.

“Maybe. If we can make a go of it.”

“The bad news?”

the ceo magazine, customer relations,

In botany, we learned that an evergreen plant has leaves that stay green throughout the year. Unlike deciduous plants, which lose their foliage during the winter or dry season, the foliage of evergreen plants remains constant.

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