the ceo magazine, revenue,
Rory J. Clark, Creator and Innovator, Focus Selling

It may be called the “summer slump,” but it’s really a revenue slump.

It happens every summer. It is the phenomenon called the “summer slump.”While vacations can be fun, it’s also a time of decreased productivity and missing creativity. Inaccurate forecasts and missed revenue targets are the norm.  To exaggerate the point, Europe is practically closed in July and August as people go on holiday.  Truly, the summer slump happens long before summer.  The cure for it, a way for you to bring distinctive advantage to your business, can be summed upin a word: activity.

emotional intelligence leadership

Research at the Harvard Business School has shown that Emotional Intelligence (EQ) – the ability to manage our own emotions and connect to the emotions of others – counts for twice as much as IQ and technical skills combined in determining who will be successful in their career and in life.  This is true if you are a CEO, the VP of Sales or Finance, or an individual contributor. 

the ceo magazine, innovation,
Aviv Shahar, President, Aviv Consulting

What if I told you that 60% of all strategic breakthroughs are lost? Conservative estimates suggest that people in upper management spend as much as 50% of their day in meetings, and nationally there are upwards of 25 million meetings every day in the U.S. But for all the action items, to-do’s, and game changing ideas, remarkably little innovation actually occurs.

CEOs typically have their minds made up about most things—social issues, business decisions, social issues. Just ask them. Very few individuals will eagerly invite you to persuade them to take on a new perspective. So if you’re going to get someone to change their behavior, actions, or opinion, you need to do it purposeful. Then ten tips can make the difference between stubborn resistance and open consideration:

10 Ways to Get Your Point Across Persuasively

the ceo magazine, mission statement,
Gary Morton, Author, Commanding Excellence: Inspiring Purpose, Passion, and Ingenuity through Leadership That Matters

Inspiring human beings to achieve the truly extraordinary requires something more than a mission statement. Well-constructed mission statements define the field of play, what the organization does on those fields, and what is unique about the organization’s approach; but they are typically too complex and lengthy to become a rally cry. Two organizations that accomplished what experts in their fields thought impossible exhibited a rally-cry-like internal ethos centered on an absolutely clear organizational purpose.  Task Force 4-68 (TF 4-68) that won an unprecedented nine of nine force-on-force engagements at the US Army’s grueling National Training Center (NTC) and device maker Stryker that grew earnings at a consistent pace of 20 percent or more for 28 consecutive years had simple, three-word goals that expressed their ultimate expectations. These goals communicated a defining commitment that went beyond a mission statement or even a mission statement on steroids. 

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