the ceo magazine, business growth,

We most often use the term “one hit wonder” to describe music performers who have had a single success. Sometimes these one-hit wonders produced novelty songs such as Jeannie C. Riley’s 1968 number-one hit “Harper Valley PTA.” In spite of the song gracing the charts in the 60s, hardly anyone today would admit to thinking the hit represented true quality. And since Ms. Riley never produced another top-seller, we can also agree she didn’t offer consistency.

Granted, leaders gain visibility for their message by speaking at a major industry event, international conference, or even a local community affair. But just as with movies, games, and apps, leaders increase their popularity and influence to a tipping point when employees share their opinions of that leader with their colleagues.

Leaders aim to make their mark on business operations, imprint their philosophies on their staff, leave their legacy on the organization.  They hope the team will remember their leadership as unique, profitable, and pleasant.  Understandable goals.

But all too often, new leaders start out with similar clichés and concepts—lines that set their staff members up for disappointment, if not downright disengagement, rather than the intended productivity boost.

Do these new-leader clichés sound familiar?

the ceo magazine, revenue,
Rory J. Clark, Creator and Innovator, Focus Selling

It may be called the “summer slump,” but it’s really a revenue slump.

It happens every summer. It is the phenomenon called the “summer slump.”While vacations can be fun, it’s also a time of decreased productivity and missing creativity. Inaccurate forecasts and missed revenue targets are the norm.  To exaggerate the point, Europe is practically closed in July and August as people go on holiday.  Truly, the summer slump happens long before summer.  The cure for it, a way for you to bring distinctive advantage to your business, can be summed upin a word: activity.

The business plan. It has been the “must” for every would-be entrepreneur. When I first started out, I read all the books about how to create the perfect one before I ventured out to get funding. While everyone has their own twist on what to include, there are some typical components. They range from an executive summary, to analyzing the competition, customer profiles, marketing and the like. It took quite a bit of time and research to develop my first plan which was lengthy- you might say it was more like a thesis. But, it did help me get funded.

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