Guest Blogger

Posts by Thought Leaders and Business Leaders who are not our regular bloggers but have valuable insights and personal stories to share with our readers.

ceo magazine management
Colin D. Baird, Vice President, Sullivan Curtis Monroe

Gemba is a Japanese term used in the lean world to define "the place where things are happening", and genchi genbutsu means "go and see for yourself". In American terms we might refer to it as Management By Walking, or Get Your Boots On.

CBS television has a hit show in Undercover Boss. The premise is that executives visit locations away from their offices where they don a different identity.  Employees not recognizing the boss are willing to give them far more accurate information about what it's like to work for the company than the boss gets from his own leadership team. 

ceo magazine, succession planning
Paul Nourigat

An unprecedented wave of staff turnover will rock most industries for the next 15 years. The retirement of CEOs, their direct reports and many highly skilled positions will create an unprecedented vacuum of human capital. As the economy improves and productivity improvement tapers off, robotics and sourcing strategies will hit their ceiling and human reinvestment will be required to fill the gaps. Regardless the size or ownership structure of American companies, most simply aren't ready.

ceo magazine, leadership
Dr. Albert de Goias

Leadership in business is not just the art of directing the motivated or motivating the confused or irresolute person.  It is about guiding the emotionally unstable to believe in themselves and tap into their unique insights.  A person’s real contribution is not driven by their ability to apply directives, but by offering valuable insights and a positive attitude.

Justin Snell, Director, Dispute Resolution & Forensics, Bennett Thrasher 

Bad Things Happen

As the CEO it’s easy to think that everyone knows, understands and believes in the vision you have for the organization. You like to think that everyone is working to accomplish the organization’s goals. After all, you spent countless sacrificial hours developing a vision and strategy for your organization. You’ve read and studied leadership techniques and how to get the most out of your people, and how to motivate, incentivize and reward them. And so it’s all the more perplexing when you learn that someone in your organization has committed fraud.

ceo magazine, customer service
Shep Hyken

Why should customer service be important to the CEO, or other executive leadership in a company? They typically don’t deal directly with customers. True, but they influence everyone in the company who does. They are the role models that others look up to for guidance. Virtually all employees emulate their actions. In short, customer service should be very important to the leadership of an organization.

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