Guest Blogger

Posts by Thought Leaders and Business Leaders who are not our regular bloggers but have valuable insights and personal stories to share with our readers.

the ceo magazine, leadership qualities,
Randall Bell, CEO, Landmark Research Group, LLC

Tennis is all about footwork. As many Roger Federer fans know, watching a great tennis player is like watching a dancer. After each shot, he returns to the middle baseline, squares his stance, and gets ready for the next return. He hits a great shot and he’s back. He hits a poor shot, and he’s back again. He moves like a rubber band. The further from the baseline he gets, the quicker he is back.

the ceo magazine, leadership qualities,
Kevin F. Davis, Founder & President, TopLine Leadership, Inc.

I’ve seen it time and again, and I’m sure you have too: a high-performing rep is promoted into sales management but never becomes as successful as a manager as they were as a rep. Why does this happen?  The core issue is an irony that has gone undetected too long: certain sales instincts which contribute to a salesperson’s success are often the exact opposite of the what will help them succeed in sales management.

the ceo magazine, customer experience,
Chip R. Bell, Author, Kaleidoscope:  Delivering Innovative Service That Sparkles

Growing up on a cattle farm is a chance to see both the promise and perils of freedom.  For months cows leisurely graze, sleep in the shade, and drink water from a nearby pond.  In the winter when there is no grass, bales of hay are delivered to their “doorstep.”  But, when the time comes for cows to be transported to market, herding can become a bit of a challenge.  It starts out rather peaceful; but, as cows are moved from the open pasture into small holding pens and then forced to go up a loading shoot and onto the truck, it requires electric prods to convert their revolt into compliance.

the ceo magazine, pivoting,
John F. Dowling

In 1985, Dick Yuengling took over the family beer business due to the failing health of his father. During that time, three major brewers controlled 70% of the US Domestic beer market. Yuengling’s share was 0.065%. Some independent brewers gave up and sold off to larger competitors. Other smaller brewers followed the M&A strategy to get bigger and chase the big 3 (Anheuser- Busch, Miller & Stroh’s).

the ceo magazine, corporate values,
Julie C. Lellis and Melissa Eggleston

Zombies have no motive other than sustaining themselves. On reckless missions to find food at all costs, they alienate and repel others. Businesses can act like zombies, and they are often easy to spot! They may make decisions that don’t prioritize others and pay the price. They can’t move quickly or adjust to change. And we really don’t know what they will do or say next.

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