Sales is a company wide responsibility to help the frontline sales person capture revenue and keep the buyer financially engaged with the firm.

Forget all the blather about how companies love their customers. It’s just talk. I’m convinced that 90 out of 100 organizations simply tolerate customers. Their customers represent only a means to profit, and that message comes through loud and clear to those callers all too often.

Five recent examples from my own experience illustrate the point all too well:

Auto-Responders That Fail to Address My Issue

the ceo magazine, sales,
Ken Rutsky, Founder & President, KJR Associates, Inc.

In the late 1980s I had the privilege to attend IBM’s vaunted sales training.  We learned techniques for rapport building, need finding, objection handling, and closing, even including, and I kid you not, the highly praised “assumptive/alternative close” which went something like, “Do you want that mainframe cabinet in White or IBM Blue?”

But most of all, we learned and practiced the hallowed technique of  “NFAR”, or Need, Feature, Advantage, Reaction. The idea being – question until you understand need, then describe your feature and its advantage, then wait for the reaction.  

If you’re a leader, a healthy dose of fear can be a good thing. In fact, if fear doesn’t push you to take a risk, to up your game, to push to top performance, you may hit rock bottom in your career. That’s especially true if you’re plan to speak before large groups of employees, customers, or colleagues.

Speaking can be a high-stakes proposition in the age of Periscope, Instagram, and live Facebook or Twitter feeds out to the world. Audience members do not take kindly to an unprepared rambler wasting their time on irrelevant topics.

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