the ceo magazine, corporate culture,
Chris Dyer, Founder & CEO, PeopleG2

Back in 2009, I barely knew what corporate culture was. My introduction came as the recession hit the United States and my company, PeopleG2, began to struggle. I took a deep look at what I could do to make things better from within, which led me to read, research, and ponder. A few years later, we came out of the recession stronger, happier, and determined. We also performed better, found huge improvements in productivity, and increased our profits. All of this was due to defining our unique culture. What seemed like a new superpower had actually been there all along.

the ceo magazine, corporate culture,
Justin Gwin, Risk Advisory Services Manager, Kaufman Rossin

Many recent high-profile scandals, such as those at Toshiba, Volkswagen, FIFA, and Wells Fargo, have shown the adverse effect of having a poor corporate culture. 

Toshiba’s $1.2 billion profit inflation scandal, which occurred over seven years and came to light last summer, was called “the most damaging event for the brand in the company’s 140-year history” by the outgoing CEO.  The Independent Investigation Committee concluded that “there existed a corporate culture at Toshiba where it was impossible to go against the boss’ will.” In less than six months from the initial announcement, the scandal had wiped roughly $8 billion off Toshiba’s market value.

the ceo magazine, corporate communication,
Jill Lublin, Author, Profit of Kindness: How to Influence Others, Establish Trust, and Build Lasting Business Relationships

Business procedures and management decisions are based on facts and not emotions. As a consequence, business communication strategies are also based on quantifiable factors. This reality makes even the self-proclaimed value-based organizations hard to articulate empathy.

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