Why Surgeons need Emotional Intelligence

You might wonder why I am talking to CEO's about Surgones.   Every company has roles that require an increbily high level of IQ and technical skills, but even in those roles, Emotional Intelligence is the differentiator of sucsess.   This article helps expain why your bright and higly analytical people still need Emotional Intelligence in the same way surgeons do. 

the ceo magazine, leadership,
Kim Christfort, National Managing Director, The Deloitte Greenhouse™ Experience team

In a time of accelerating change, increasing disruption, and heightened uncertainty, success demands unprecedented levels of resilience and flexibility from executives.  CEOs in particular must strike a dynamic balance between seemingly paradoxical priorities - embracing risk while mitigating it, exploring new, untested, business models while executing efficiently on the existing ones, capitalizing on proprietary expertise while challenging established orthodoxies, and of course driving short term yields while fueling long term opportunities [i].  It takes real mental and emotional energy to maintain these tensions as an individual.  But the challenge of leading a truly associative organization, one that can operate effectively while sustaining unresolved tensions, is best met by CEOs that can harness the diverse strengths inherent in their leadership team.

the ceo magazine, leadership,

Why do some people conquer the dragon, but others succumb to it? Why can some overcome adversity when it devastates others? I wanted to know the answer, so in 1995, I decided to study heroes, people who had overcome significant adversity and emerged healthy and hardy—people who had taken care of others while they coped with their own hardships.

the ceo magazine, talent management,
Mostafa Sayyadi, Author, Leading Between the Lines

Effective talent management is needed to achieve a high degree of sustainable competitive performance. Executives can improve performance by taking a more strategic approach---suggesting that organization’s collective-interests are strategic tools that need to be managed to create competitiveness. Executives can therefore contribute to organizational performance through developing relationships with subordinates that link talents’ individual interests to the organization’s collective-interests.

the ceo magazine, networking,
James Millar, Author, Building Bridges: The Case for Executive Peer Networks

It’s no surprise that many people avoid professional “networking” activities. As a team of researchers reported in the May 2016 Harvard Business Review: “We know that [networking is] critical to our professional success, yet we find it taxing and often distasteful.” These scholars found that negative feelings toward professional networking were “not simply dislike or discomfort. It was a deeper feeling of moral contamination and inauthenticity.” Strong words, indeed!

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