the ceo magazine, mission statement,
Gary Morton, Author, Commanding Excellence: Inspiring Purpose, Passion, and Ingenuity through Leadership That Matters

Inspiring human beings to achieve the truly extraordinary requires something more than a mission statement. Well-constructed mission statements define the field of play, what the organization does on those fields, and what is unique about the organization’s approach; but they are typically too complex and lengthy to become a rally cry. Two organizations that accomplished what experts in their fields thought impossible exhibited a rally-cry-like internal ethos centered on an absolutely clear organizational purpose.  Task Force 4-68 (TF 4-68) that won an unprecedented nine of nine force-on-force engagements at the US Army’s grueling National Training Center (NTC) and device maker Stryker that grew earnings at a consistent pace of 20 percent or more for 28 consecutive years had simple, three-word goals that expressed their ultimate expectations. These goals communicated a defining commitment that went beyond a mission statement or even a mission statement on steroids. 

As CEO, you’re frequently called on to introduce someone—a celebrity for your big client event of the year, an industry guru for your management meeting, a politician for a community gathering.  Whatever the occasion, you never want to be that person who disappoints the speaker, confuses the crowd, and embarrasses yourself.

the ceo magazine, leadership qualities,
Gustav Degerman, Founder & CEO, Portfoliobox

CEO’s are notorious for taking control and managing their business, but at the same token, it is important for CEOs to empower their employees in a way that increases productivity, and in turn increases the overall business development. What better time than the present or the new year for business leaders to reflect on their business model. So what works and what doesn’t?

the ceo magazine,  risk-taking,

April 18, 2017 marked the 75th anniversary of the dramatic bombing of Japan that followed the attack on Pearl Harbor. On that day in 1942, at 8:20 in the morning, 16 B-25 bombers under the command of Jimmy Doolittle took off from the USS Hornet 750 miles from Japan.  In 1942, most experts found the notion of America—a county ill-prepared for any sort of warfare—making a direct assault on the Japanese superpower almost inconceivable. FDR disagreed.

the ceo magazine, marketing,
Gerri Knilans, President, Trade Press Services

            CEOs run organizations. They are the highest-level executive officers in the company, and their primary duties include driving revenue and profit, making major corporate decisions and managing the overall operations and resources of a company. Even if the company is small, there’s still only one person at the top responsible for those key functions.As business becomes more competitive, complex and global, the need for CEOs to expand their knowledge beyond finance and operations to sales and marketing is an imperative.

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