Stories and lessons from the struggle and success of those who have realized their entrepreneurial dreams whether as first timers or veterans.

The COO of my consulting firm years ago used to start staff meetings with 5-15 minutes of small talk. Although he intended to promote socializing, the adverse consequences were late-arrivers, difficulty in focusing on serious discussion at the start of the meeting, and low energy throughout the remainder of the meeting.

Nobody I know proudly brags about being a micromanager. Frankly, most vehemently deny the label. Yet the workplace overflows with them. Here’s how to spot them on your team before you give them even bigger opportunities to frustrate the people who work with them. And if deep down you fear you may be falling into the micromanagement trap yourself, consider these signs before it’s too late to make a change.

Micromanagers Complain About Work Overload

the ceo magazine, innovation,
Jon Kolko, Author, Creative Clarity

Creativity is fundamental to driving the market. It's no longer a word used to describe aesthetics or the "icing on the cake"; creativity is a required competency for organizations who seek to identify new market opportunities, define new ways of running their business, and ship innovative products and services. But the creative process, and creative people, can be frustrating. The process is messy and organic, and the people are emotional and eccentric. Often, conservative companies who have established ways of doing and thinking have trouble attracting and retaining creative talent, who feel stifled by regimented processes, rules, and a hierarchical culture of consensus.

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