Linda Henman

Dr. Linda Henman is one of those rare experts who can say she’s a coach, consultant, speaker, and author. For more than 30 years, she has worked with Fortune 500 Companies and small businesses that want to think strategically, grow dramatically, promote intelligently, and compete successfully today and tomorrow. 

the ceo magazine, business growth,

We most often use the term “one hit wonder” to describe music performers who have had a single success. Sometimes these one-hit wonders produced novelty songs such as Jeannie C. Riley’s 1968 number-one hit “Harper Valley PTA.” In spite of the song gracing the charts in the 60s, hardly anyone today would admit to thinking the hit represented true quality. And since Ms. Riley never produced another top-seller, we can also agree she didn’t offer consistency.

the ceo magazine, risk taking,

In December of 2014, Discovery Channel aired a special called “Eaten Alive.” The program featured Paul Rosolie, a “naturalist” who planned to don a snake-proof suit and live through getting swallowed by a 20-foot-long anaconda. Apparently, the goal was to provide Rosolie the insider (pun intended) perspective of a snake’s digestive processes.

the ceo magazine, business growth,

As my clients began to emerge from the global economic turmoil that began in 2008, they indicated they had learned numerous lessons—the most important one: When leaders make good decisions, little else matters. When they refuse to make decisions, or show a pattern of making bad ones, nothing else matters. As I helped these leaders position themselves for the new economy, I began to see what others didn’t see.

the ceo magazine, personal growth,

What is this comfort zone we hear so much about, and where did it originate? You’ll hear people describe their comfort zones differently, but my clients tend to describe it as an emotional state where things feel familiar—a place where they experience low levels of anxiety and stress. When we’re in our comfort zones, we have minimum uncertainty, scarcity, and vulnerability. We feel in control there; we’re relaxed; and our basic needs have been met.

the ceo magazine,  risk-taking,

April 18, 2017 marked the 75th anniversary of the dramatic bombing of Japan that followed the attack on Pearl Harbor. On that day in 1942, at 8:20 in the morning, 16 B-25 bombers under the command of Jimmy Doolittle took off from the USS Hornet 750 miles from Japan.  In 1942, most experts found the notion of America—a county ill-prepared for any sort of warfare—making a direct assault on the Japanese superpower almost inconceivable. FDR disagreed.

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