Linda Henman

Dr. Linda Henman is one of those rare experts who can say she’s a coach, consultant, speaker, and author. For more than 30 years, she has worked with Fortune 500 Companies and small businesses that want to think strategically, grow dramatically, promote intelligently, and compete successfully today and tomorrow. 

the ceo magazine,  risk-taking,

April 18, 2017 marked the 75th anniversary of the dramatic bombing of Japan that followed the attack on Pearl Harbor. On that day in 1942, at 8:20 in the morning, 16 B-25 bombers under the command of Jimmy Doolittle took off from the USS Hornet 750 miles from Japan.  In 1942, most experts found the notion of America—a county ill-prepared for any sort of warfare—making a direct assault on the Japanese superpower almost inconceivable. FDR disagreed.

the ceo magazine, decision making,

Early in 1998, my doctoral committee met to approve my dissertation proposal. Or, at least I thought that was the goal of the meeting. As it turns out, they met to discuss all the reasons for their disapproval: My research thesis was inconsistent; I had proposed a flawed research methodology; and I had formulated inane interview questions. After the meeting, I sat crestfallen and dejected in the lounge staring into space. A fellow doctoral candidate joined me and asked about my pained look. I explained the number of things my committee had agreed were wrong with my dissertation. She broke into a smile and said, “Linda, at least you got them to agree on a bunch of stuff!”

the ceo magazine, mental toughness,

Prior to the Patriots’ stunning comeback in Super Bowl 2017, quarterback Tom Brady answered the question about what makes his team so special: “Mental toughness.” He could have said exceptional physical strength, training, and superior talent, but he didn’t. What team that makes it to the Super Bowl doesn’t embody these? Mental toughness involves something else, something more.

the ceo magazine, motivation,

In 2016, Wells Fargo fired more than 5,000 employees who learned the hard way that carrots don’t work—at least not in the long run. Decision-makers tied a substantial piece of these employees’ compensation to steep sales targets and made reaching them a condition of continued employment. They saw movement, if not true motivation. Even when launched with the best of intentions—which the leaders at Wells Fargo did not display—evidence shows that carrots-as-motivators ultimately fail. Incentives designed to spur workers to do their best can push them to engage in unethical behavior—to do their worst. 

the ceo magazine, business growth,

Each year I aspire to teach my clients lessons that will help them improve their personal and professional lives and their businesses. But what many of them probably don’t realize is that I simultaneously learn as I teach. And even though I’ve been consulting for more than thirty-five years, each year and each client has a new lesson to teach. Here are my top ten for 2016:

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