the ceo magazine, finance
MJ Gottlieb, Author, How to Ruin a Business Without Really Trying

Most start-ups need to secure a small initial investment (seed capital) in order to have the resources in place to get their companies off the ground. Many get their seed capital in the form of ‘friends and family money’ which I think is always a very good idea for a few reasons. One, because seed money is normally too small to entice a more sophisticated investor to get involved, and secondly, you have a much better chance of securing an investment from people who are already routing for your success.

the ceo magazine, finance
Fiona Brophy, Partner, Perkins Coie

There was much fanfare around the passing of the JOBS Act, especially around the relaxation of the securities laws with respect to the use of “general solicitations.”  Notwithstanding the excitement in the blogosphere, the revised rules also come with some hidden costs that CEOs should be aware of and that make using a “general solicitation” in fundraising less attractive.

the ceo magazine, finance
Stacia Pierce, CEO, Ultimate Lifestyle Enterprises

There are many aspiring entrepreneurs looking for more revenue and resources, with no idea how to make it happen. I get letters every day that say, “I want to start my business—but I’m not making the money that I need to do so!” Some try borrowing from relatives and others look for investment capital opportunities. Although getting capital for your business is hard to come by these days, all hope is not lost. You can build your dream business on your own through self-funding.

the ceo magazine, small business
Thomas P. Rood, Paycheck Independence Day

Many people will tell you that if you want to get rich, you have to start your own business.  According to the SBA Office of Advocacy, in 2009 there were over 27 million businesses in the United States.  It appears a lot of people want to get rich.

Once you take the plunge and start your own business, what is your chance for survival?  According to the SBA, 69% of new firms started in 2000 or later survive at least two years and 51% of those firms survive at least five years.  In the short-term, your chances for survival are actually quite good.

the ceo magazine
James T. Carroll

When negotiating stock or other forms of equity in their companies, executives too often deal in terms of percentages: an offer letter with a new employee may promise her “options for 2% of the company” or a commercial agreement might entitle a vendor to “5% of the company’s common stock.” While the executives may find percentages a convenient shorthand for understanding the size of the “slice of the pie” being negotiated, when they deliver those terms to the company’s counsel, groans and (polite) admonishments are likely to follow.

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