Those who can't manage themselves can't be expected to manage anything else either.

Keith, CEO of a Fortune 500 financial organization, called with an intriguing project—one I’ve never been asked to repeat elsewhere, but one with fascinating results.

The Project

the ceo magazine, productivity,
Corrie Shanahan, Author, Do it, Mean it, Be it. The Keys to Achieve Success, Happiness and Everything You Deserve at Work and in Life 

In my new book "Do it, Mean it, Be it. The Keys to Achieve Success, Happiness and Everything You Deserve at Work and in Life” I describe the strategies and secrets of people who are not only extremely successful but who also have a life. Why? Because I believe the two are not mutually exclusive. I believe it’s possible to do a great job, be rewarded for it, and also have fun. And if you’re not doing that, what’s the point? I interview a number of CEOs in the book and here are some of the things they had in common about getting more done, in less time.

Leaders aim to make their mark on business operations, imprint their philosophies on their staff, leave their legacy on the organization.  They hope the team will remember their leadership as unique, profitable, and pleasant.  Understandable goals.

But all too often, new leaders start out with similar clichés and concepts—lines that set their staff members up for disappointment, if not downright disengagement, rather than the intended productivity boost.

Do these new-leader clichés sound familiar?

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