the ceo magazine, leadership,
Jeff Thompson, MD, CEO Emeritus and Executive Advisor, Gundersen Healthy System

As CEOs we are generally very skilled at strategic planning or operational implementation. Many are great at recruiting and others are superb at building strong teams or diverse partnerships. All of those are very important. But one of the key pieces that many of us do poorly is managing marginal performances or behavior by other senior leaders or recognized “rising stars” in the organization.

!

There is a lot to admire about successful business people. Because they made millions or perhaps billions it sometimes overshadows their own inadequacies. It could even beg the question: are they successful because of themselves or in spite of themselves?

the ceo magazine, leadership qualities,
Diana Jones, Author, Leadership Material: How Personal Experience Shapes Executive Presence

Leaders maintaining relationships and emotional equilibrium under stressful conditions is more important than technical acumen. This capacity is prerequisite for inspiring others. Leaders with presence remain steady under pressure.

the ceo magazine, personal growth,

What is this comfort zone we hear so much about, and where did it originate? You’ll hear people describe their comfort zones differently, but my clients tend to describe it as an emotional state where things feel familiar—a place where they experience low levels of anxiety and stress. When we’re in our comfort zones, we have minimum uncertainty, scarcity, and vulnerability. We feel in control there; we’re relaxed; and our basic needs have been met.

the ceo magazine, work life balance,
Fabrice Dumans, Co-founder & CEO, Timyo

“My number one priority is my family.”

I would guess that nearly all of us have said the above or something like it. I know I have. I’ve also said something like the following:

“Our company is growing really fast, it’s great! Plenty of 15-hour days, but you’ve got to give 100%!”

I meant both things when I said them, or, at least, I thought I did. But if I was working non-stop for months on end...how was I prioritizing my family? I rationalized it the way that everyone does: “sure, I’m working really hard, but I’m doing it for them.” Putting insane hours and unlimited energy into work was something I was willing to do to make life better for my family, to build them a nicer life. The thing about a fulfilling life, though, is that it’s nice if there is a parent or a partner in it, not just some guy who comes home late at night and is back out the door early the next morning.

Pages

Contact

Follow The Blog

   Email * 
Subscribe to Syndicate

Blog Categories

Blog Authors

kajabi
eclub

EC

ad5
ad6

ad7

ad8