Dianna Booher

Dianna Booher works with organizations to improve their productivity through clear communication and with individuals to increase their impact by a stronger executive presence.

CEOs typically have their minds made up about most things—social issues, business decisions, social issues. Just ask them. Very few individuals will eagerly invite you to persuade them to take on a new perspective. So if you’re going to get someone to change their behavior, actions, or opinion, you need to do it purposeful. Then ten tips can make the difference between stubborn resistance and open consideration:

10 Ways to Get Your Point Across Persuasively

As CEO, you’re frequently called on to introduce someone—a celebrity for your big client event of the year, an industry guru for your management meeting, a politician for a community gathering.  Whatever the occasion, you never want to be that person who disappoints the speaker, confuses the crowd, and embarrasses yourself.

Pop quiz here:

  • Do you sometimes second-guess yourself about decisions until opportunities pass?
  • Do colleagues and clients frequently seek your opinion on their big decisions?
  • Do you often get feedback on the quality of your contributions in meetings?
  • Do those meeting ideas produce the results you intend?

Like artists, wise leaders analyze and focus on a situation or problem. Then they decide and act. And even then, as theologian and author Oswald Chambers put it: “It’s never wise to be cocksure.”

The essence of leadership is communication: to cast a vision, to inspire, to collaborate on strategy, and to engage followers in accomplishing a mission. But let’s face it: Many leaders fall flat on their face when it comes to communication.

The only thing that keeps the organization afloat and followers on target are those second-in-command people “picking up the slack” and translating for those leaders who struggle as communicators.

 

 

Forget all the blather about how companies love their customers. It’s just talk. I’m convinced that 90 out of 100 organizations simply tolerate customers. Their customers represent only a means to profit, and that message comes through loud and clear to those callers all too often.

Five recent examples from my own experience illustrate the point all too well:

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