The people part of business operations.

the ceo magazine, risk taking,

In December of 2014, Discovery Channel aired a special called “Eaten Alive.” The program featured Paul Rosolie, a “naturalist” who planned to don a snake-proof suit and live through getting swallowed by a 20-foot-long anaconda. Apparently, the goal was to provide Rosolie the insider (pun intended) perspective of a snake’s digestive processes.

the ceo magazine, stress management,
Denise R. Green Founder, Brilliance Inc.

Your people are suffering -- but they won’t tell you until it’s too late.

Recently, a CEO received public praise when he tweeted his appreciation and approval to an employee who announced to her team that she’d be taking two days of sick leave for her mental health. While the news article focused mainly on the CEO’s admirable response, the more amazing story was the manager’s honesty. 

Leaders aim to make their mark on business operations, imprint their philosophies on their staff, leave their legacy on the organization.  They hope the team will remember their leadership as unique, profitable, and pleasant.  Understandable goals.

But all too often, new leaders start out with similar clichés and concepts—lines that set their staff members up for disappointment, if not downright disengagement, rather than the intended productivity boost.

Do these new-leader clichés sound familiar?

Pages

Contact

Follow The Blog

   Email * 
Subscribe to Syndicate

Blog Categories

Blog Authors

kajabi
eclub

EC

ad5
ad6

ad7

ad8